Nürburgring (iRacing)

Nürburgring
Information
Location Nürburg
Country De.png Germany
Configurations

Grand Prix Strecke


Grand Prix
5.15 km
3.20 miles
Grand Prix without Arena
4.63 km
2.88 miles
BES/WEC
5.15 km
3.20 miles
Sprintstrecke
3.63 km
2.25 miles
Kurzanbindung without Arena
3.12 km
1.94 miles
Müllenbachschleife
1.50 km
0.93 miles


Nordschleife


Touristenfahrten
19.10 km
11.87 miles
Industriefahrten
20.82 km
12.94 miles


Combined


Gesamtstrecke 24h
25.38 km
15.77 miles
Gesamtstrecke Long
25.88 km
16.08 miles
Gesamtstrecke VLN
24.37 km
15.14 miles
Gesamtstrecke Short without Arena
23.87 km
14.83 miles

Grand Prix Strecke

The Nürburgring’s GP-Strecke (Grosser Preis Strecke) was constructed on the former site of the pit complex of the Nürburgring’s Nordschliefe and Südschleife in 1982-83. Originally a 12 turn, 4.556km (2.832 mile) circuit, the GP-Strecke was revamped in 2002 with the replacement of the Castrol Chicane by the Haug-Hook right hander and subsequent omega-shaped Mercedes Arena turn, bringing the circuit to its current 16 turn, 5.148k (3.199 mile) specification. Along with the parabolic Dunlop-Kehre, the track’s signature section is the Michael Schumacher S formed by Turns 9-10. The GP Strecke was the home of the German Grand Prix and/or the European Grand Prix between 1984 and 2006 and, subsequently, alternated with Hockenheim as site of the German GP until the race was dropped from the F1 calendar altogether in 2015. The track continues to host rounds of the German Touring Car Championship, Blancpain GT and Endurance Series, World Endurance Championship and, in combination with the remaining 12.9 mile Nordschleife, the 24 Hours of the Nurburgring.

Nordschleife

Widely considered to be the world’s most demanding road course, the Nürburging’s Nordschleife twists and turns, rises and falls for 12.9 miles through Germany’s Eifel Mountains. The ‘Ring boasts an elevation gain/loss of nearly 1,000 feet per lap and many of its 70+ bends like the Hatzenbach, Adenauer Forst, Wehrseifen, the Karussell, Pflanzgarten and Schwalbenschwanz are steeped in motorsports lore.

Constructed between 1925-27, the Nürburgring originally consisted of two circuits – the 14.1 mile Nordschleife and a companion 7.7 mile Südschleife which were occasionally combined to form a mammoth, 17.6 mile Gesamtstrecke. The Nordschleife, however, was the centerpiece of the facility and hosted the German Grand Prix Formula One and 1000K sports car races through the 1970s when major safety renovations were implemented. But the 1976 German Grand Prix saw world champion Niki Lauda nearly perish in a fiery accident and the race was subsequently moved to Hockenheim.

However, the German Grand Prix returned to the Nürburgring after the Nordschleife’s start/finish area and much of the Südschleife were demolished to create a modern circuit – the 3.2 mile Grand Prix Strecke in 1982-83. While the modern circuit played hosted to the German Grand Prix (and occasionally the European Grand Prix) from 1984-2014), the German Touring Car Championship and other events, the Nordschleife (shortened to 12.9 miles to make way for the GP Strecke) is still used for testing and club races and, in combination with the GP Strecke, the 24 Hours of the Nürburgring. When not in use for races and testing, the Nordschleife is open to the public for lapping days.